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Midlands PAL was officially launched on Friday 7th June at 2pm in the Aidan Heavey Public Library, Athlone by Mr. Phil Hogan TD, Minister for the Environment, Community and Local Government.

Midlands PAL is the latest PAL scheme to be set up, in addition to Cork PAL and Music PAL. Midlands PAL aims to create a seamless route to information resources for the public by opening up access to a wide range of midland libraries: public, academic and HSE. These libraries have all been made easily accessible through the scheme. The current participants in Midlands PAL are Athlone Institute of Technology; HSE Midlands Libraries; Laois County Libraries; Longford County Libraries; Offaly County Libraries; Roscommon County Libraries; and Westmeath County Libraries.

Welcome Midlands PAL!

Welcome to PAL – the Pathways to Learning programme which supports greater access to library and archives collections and services throughout the island of Ireland.

There are currently three PAL resource-sharing schemes, Cork PALMusic PAL and Midlands PAL which make access easier to libraries and archives throughout the island of Ireland.

Read the latest news on PAL below or click here for further information on this initiative.

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Users can now view online the music contained in the entire Hudleston Collection of printed guitar music in digital format. This is freely accessible via the Royal Irish Academy of Music online catalogue.

 

This unique resource, held in the RIAM special collections, contains over 1,000 works for guitar (both solo and chamber music) in original editions from the 19th century.

 

It was the private collection of Josiah Andrew Hudleston (1799 – 1865) who lived for many years in Madras and subsequently settled in Ireland in 1857. Throughout his life, Hudleston collected works for guitar composed by his contemporaries, several of whom he knew personally. This corpus of work represents a very flourishing period in the history of guitar music, featuring composers such as Giuliani, Sor and Carulli, and many other lesser known names.

 

You can search for material by going to our online catalogue http://library.riam.ie and selecting “Hudleston Collection” from the menu of options.

 

We welcome any feedback from users, which can be sent to library@riam.ie.

 

 

NUI Maynooth Library is delighted to add the music library of renowned French musician Gabriel Baille (1832-1909) to its exceptional research collections.

Gabriel Baille was at the centre of musical life in the French city of Perpignan.  He composed for organ, piano, orchestra and mixed choir.  His music library, of 81 volumes, contains much of interest to NUI Maynooth and St. Patrick’s College Maynooth, particularly with regard to 19th century French editions of instrumental methods, organ music and sacred music.

 

Musical Tales

Musical Tales – a series of four concerts in Dublin City Libraries, 26 Oct – 2 Nov 2011

In celebration of Dublin’s UNESCO City of Literature status and to highlight the rich connections between Irish writers, past and present, and Irish composers, The Contemporary Music Centre, in association with the Royal Irish Academy of Music, presents Musical Tales.

Musical Tales is a series of four concerts in Dublin City Libraries from 24 Oct – 2 Nov 2011, funded by the Dublin City Council Arts Office Arts Grants 2011 and supported by the Dublin City Council Library Development Office.

The concert programme, curated and introduced by Irish ComposerBenjamin Dwyer will be performed by the RIAM Milesian Quartet and renowned Irish mezzo-soprano Imelda Drumm (left). Musical Tales features works by Irish composers: Rachel HolsteadMichael Holohan, Kevin O’ConnellFrank CorcoranJohn Buckley and Siobhan Cleary. These composers have found inspiration in Old Irish and in the Irish writers Seamus Heaney, Paul Durcan and Oscar Wilde. Musical Tales invites the listener to take a musical journey inspired by the words of Irish writers and poets, with music that gives a fresh perspective on Irish literature old and new. Further details

 

 

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